Tag Archive | crochet

How to Crochet With Beads

I was watching a craft show on PBS a couple of weeks ago, and saw this method for crocheting with beads.  Instead of threading all of your beads onto the yarn before you start crocheting, you can add each bead as you go.

crochet with beads

Materials

  • Yarn
  • Crochet Hook
  • Beads
  • Small piece of wire

Watch the video for details!

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Pinterest Picks–Vol 3

What better way to pass the time during the cold month of January than by investigating new craft ideas on Pinterest?

Snowman Scarf

This scarf would be a great way to chase away the winter blahs. The pattern costs $5, but if you know a little about crocheting and adapting patterns, you can probably figure out a good knock off. It looks like it’s mostly a matter of increasing and decreasing as you make stripes.

Homemade Pin Catcher

Old dishes are a great thrift store find. They’re usually affordable–especially if you’re buying one that’s not part of a matching set.  I would probably use hot glue to attach the magnet, but I think super glue would work as well.

Candy Heart Candle Holder

All you need for this one is a vase that fits inside another vase, and a bag of those chalky heart candies. You could substitute other candies, but I would stay away from anything chocolate if you intend to light the candle inside.

Perler Bead Pattern

You might remember perler beads from when you were little. You put plastic beads on a tray, then iron it to melt the beads together.  The thing I like about all the perler bead patterns on Pinterest is that they’re easy to turn into cross stitch patterns. They’re drawn on a grid like cross stitch, and it makes an easy pattern that’s good for beginners.

Knook Advice

I keep trying to get the hang of knooking.  One of my readers directed me to a tutorial she posted, but I still have a hard time with my technique.  This pin suggested that I’m thinking too much like a crocheter as I try to knook, so maybe if I adjust my grip it will work a little better.  I haven’t given up on it, but I also haven’t produced anything worth photographing!

What’s Next?

I’m making valentines with my sorority to send to kids at Riley Children’s Hospital.  I’ll let you know how it goes!

Craft Goals for 2015

I don’t make New Year’s resolutions, but this year I do have a few crafting goals.

Revisit Knooking

Knooking is a cross between knitting and crocheting (with a crochet hook).  I got some knooks and an instruction booklet for Christmas last year, but I haven’t had much success with it.  I’m going to try it again this year.  Maybe if I try a different yarn than before, it will work better.

Knook

Crochet Something for Myself

Usually, when I crochet something, it’s for someone else.  It’s probably been seven or eight years since I’ve crocheted something for no other reason than to just make myself something pretty.  This year, I’m going to fix that.  I think I’ll do a matching scarf and hat set.

Finish a Cross Stitch

I started a cross stitch at some point last year, and I never finished it.  I lost patience with it, then I lost the half-finished attempt in the depths of my closet.  But I recently found it again, and this year I’m going to finish it!

Cross Stitch

Pin All the Things!

Even though I spend a lot of time on Pinterest, I’m always forgetting to pin my own creations.  My final goal is to remember to pin all the projects that I’ve spent so much time on.

Happy 2015, and happy crafting!

Santa Hat Pattern: Double Crochet

There are a lot of free patterns to knit or single crochet a Santa hat, but I had a hard time finding a double crochet pattern I liked.  So here’s the pattern I created.  I prefer double crochet because I think it’s faster and stretchier than single crochet.  I made this hat for a 4-month-old, but since a Santa hat is basically a cone, and you just have to keep making it bigger to make different sizes, it’s very easy to adapt this pattern for different ages. Just keep repeating the increasing pattern until the opening looks like the right size.

This pattern starts out similarly to any basic double crochet hat, like this one.  The main difference is that while a regular hat increases every round, a Santa hat increases every other round.

Santa Hat

Materials

One skein red yarn

One skein white yarn

Size G hook

White pom pom

 

Pattern

(With Red) Chain (ch) 4 and use a slip stitch (sl st) to join to the first chain stitch to create a loop.

Row 1:  Ch 3. Double crochet (dc) 5 into the middle of the loop. Join with sl st to the top of the first ch 3 in the row. 6 stitches.

Row 2:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same stitch (st), dc into the next st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 12 stitches.

Row 3:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 12 stitches.

Row 4:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 2 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 2 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 18 stitches.

Row 5:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 18 stitches.

Row 6:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 3 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 3 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 24 stitches.

Row 7:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 24 stitches.

Row 8:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 4 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 4 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 30 stitches.

Row 9:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 30 stitches.

Row 10:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 5 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 5 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 36 stitches.

Row 11:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 36 stitches.

Row 12:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 6 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 6 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 42 stitches.

Row 13:  Ch 3. Double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 42 stitches.

Row 14:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 7 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 7 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 48 stitches.

Row 15-25:  Ch 3. Double crochet in each st around.  Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 48 stitches.

Row 26-27:  (With White) Ch 2. Half double crochet into every stitch. Join with sl st to the top of ch 2. 48 stitches.

Finish off, weave in the ends, and sew a white pom-pom to the tip.

 

What’s Next?

More Christmas crafts!

Pinterest Picks–Vol. 1

I’ve been on the road a lot this past month, and haven’t had much time outside of the car for crafting.  Time in the car can be a great time for crafting…but it’s also a great time for napping!  I had planned to crochet, but instead I spent most of the time on Pinterest.  Here are some of my favorite crochet pins I found.

 

One of my trips this month was to wine country up in the Finger Lakes of New York.  So what better way to start this list than with a free crochet pattern for a wine tote?  This is a great way to give a bottle of wine as a gift.

I’ve been driving my mom’s old car recently, and the seat belt is itchy and scratches my neck.  I’ve adjusted it as much as I can, but I’m going to make this seat belt cover to make it more comfortable.

This scarf looks really easy.  There’s no pattern with the link, but all you need to do is crochet circles and stitch them together.  Then stitch an M on them all.  This looks like a good way to use up scraps.

Another way to use up scraps–a reusable Swiffer!  I have some leftover Pipsqueak yarn from a baby blanket that I think would catch dust well.

If you’re anything like me, you don’t start your Christmas crafts until it’s too late to finish them by December.  Now is the time to start thinking about Christmas crafts if you want to finish them before you have to start thinking about all the shopping, baking, and decorating.

Happy pinning!

Tips for Crocheting and Blocking Doilies

Craft BookMy great-grandmother crocheted a couple hundred doilies in her lifetime.  My family inherited several, and I’ve been feeling inspired to try making one myself.  My mom found a book she had bought years ago (for 29 cents!) that had a simple doily pattern that I decided to make.  Choose something with a lot of open spaces for your first project–it will go faster that way! This is a good pattern to start with.

Choosing Your Thread and Hook

I bought Coats and Clark size 10 thread and a size 6 hook.  Hooks for crocheting with thread are sized differently than hooks for yarn, so don’t use a size 6 yarn hook and expect the desired result.  With hooks for crocheting with thread (for lace or doilies) the hooks get larger as the numbers get smaller.  A size 6 hook was the largest of this type of hook that I could find at my local craft store.  I recommend choosing a light color of thread.  I’ve said before that lighter colors make it easier to see your work, which is particularly helpful as you’re just learning a new technique.  I chose a variegated pastel thread, because there’s no rule that a doily has to be white!

Getting StartedFirst few rounds

Thread for lace or doilies is much harder to hold than yarn is, and my tension was sort of hit or miss for the first couple of rounds.  But don’t give up! It gets easier as you go!  Another thing I noticed is that the thread would often slip off the hook as I would try to draw up a loop.  If this happens to you, remember that even if you wrap the thread all the way around the hook, you’ll still only draw up one loop.  Also, switching from yarn to thread takes patience.

Finishing Off

I didn’t weave in my ends as aggressively as I do for a hat or blanket because this doily will not be worn, stretched, or washed often.  I just sort of worked the ends.  A yarn needle would have been too large, so I used an embroidery needle.  It worked beautifully!

BlockingMy doily!

The instructions in the book said to starch and lightly press the doily when it was finished.  I don’t have any starch, and all that seemed unnecessary.  It was a little curled, but not too bad.  I just filled a clean spray bottle with some water and placed the doily on a towel.  I spritzed the entire thing lightly and pressed out the curls.  Then I worked my way around the border, spritzing a little each time, and reshaping the edging into nice round  curves with my fingers.  Keep the doily flat and laid out in the right shape until it’s dry and it will keep its shape.

What’s Next?

I found some cute patriotic fabric at the craft store that I hope to turn into something for the 4th of July!

Free Pattern: Double Crochet Beret

I made this hat with very thin bamboo yarn, but it’s easy to adapt this pattern for medium weight yarn.  For the bamboo yarn I used, I used a thinner hook, like E or F.  For medium weight yarn, use G, H, or I.  Just choose something that works well with the yarn you’ve chosen.  This pattern uses the first type of seam I learned for crocheting in the round.  This seam will be somewhat visible in the finished product.  The pattern is written out for medium weight yarn.  If you are using thinner yarn and a smaller hook, increase for more rows, until the diameter is the desired size.

This hat was my first experience with bamboo yarn.

Start With a Circle

Chain (ch) 4 and use a slip stitch (sl st) to join to the first chain stitch to create a loop.

Row 1:  Ch 3. Double crochet (dc) 11 into the middle of the loop. Join with sl st to the top of the first ch 3 in the row. 12 stitches.

Row 2:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same stitch (st), dc into the next st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 24 stitches.

Row 3:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 2 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 2 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 36 stitches.

Row 4:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 3 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 3 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 48 stitches.

Row 5:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 4 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 4 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 60 stitches.

Row 6:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 5 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 5 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 72 stitches.

Row 7:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 6 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 6 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 84 stitches.

Row 8:  Ch 3. Double crochet into the same st, dc into the next 7 st. <2 dc into next st, dc in next 7 st> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 96 stitches.

Row 9:  Ch 3. Double crochet in each st around.  Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 96 stitches.

 

Beret vs. Slouchy Hat

At this point in the pattern, preference plays a role.  How wide do you want the beret to be? Do you want it to be more pancake shaped, or more of a slouchy hat?  I opted for more of a slouchy hat.  If you want it more pancake-y, start decreasing rows immediately.  For a slouchy hat, repeat Row 9 until your hat is the desired slouchiness.

 

Decreasing Rows

Row 10:  Ch 3.  Dc in next 6 st. Decrease the next two st together (yarn over and draw up a loop in first st then yarn over and pull yarn through first two loops, yarn over and draw up a loop in second st then yarn over and pull yarn through first two loops, then pull yarn through all remaining loops).  <Dc in next 7 st, decrease> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 84 stitches.

Row 11:  Ch 3. Dc in next 5 st. Decrease. <Dc in next 6 st, decrease> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 72 stitches.

Row 12:  Ch 3. Dc in next 4 st. Decrease. <Dc in next 5 st, decrease> Repeat <> until end of row. Join with sl st to the top of ch 3. 60 stitches.

 

Sizing

Continue decreasing each row until the opening for the hat is the desired size.  For each row after that point, dc in each st around.  Continue until hat band is desired length.

Finish off and weave in the ends.

 

Questions?

If you have any questions about this pattern, or you are having trouble with any part of it, leave a comment or find me on Twitter and I will help you!